Women's SportLocal Club Opportunities

Clubs in the Horsham District that exclusively cater for girls and women or have specific sections that do so include:

Articles of Interest

September 2017 - This Girl Can: Updated Resources for Schools

In 2015, Sport England launched its This Girl Can campaign. Its images of real women and girls jiggling, wiggling and having fun generated headlines across the world. 

Sport England has worked with the Association for Physical Education (afPE) to produce a range of resources to support the campaign. The resources have recently been refreshed and updated.

Resources for schools include:

  • Six themed workshops focused on the campaign’s emotional themes and featuring flexible and interactive tasks
  • Hints and tips to help staff and students actively implement the workshop ideas

Read more

June 2016 - Changing the Game for Girls: In Action Report Published

girls in sport

Women in Sport releases the findings of a two-year project aimed at improving the provision of PE for girls in schools. Changing the Game for Girls: In Action makes tried and tested recommendations that are now being applied in schools across the country, to provide a solution to the alarmingly low levels of girls’ playing sport.

Only 7% of girls currently meet the government recommendations for physical activity and a third of girls age 12-15 in England are classified as overweight or obese. Now, within weeks of plans being announced to fund more sport in schools through a tax on sugary drinks, Changing the Game for Girls: In Action shares tested strategies on how best to address these shocking figures.

Funded by the Department of Health, the new research aims to inspire girls to take part in and enjoy sport at school, developing a positive relationship with sport from a young age as a long term, effective way to stay healthy throughout their adult lives.

Nearly 2 million fewer women than men take part in sport at least once per week and, finding from their study in 2012 that this gender gap between girls and boys playing sport begins to open at around age 8 – much earlier than previously thought – Women in Sport developed and piloted new approaches and interventions for girls at 25 schools across England.

The findings in our report highlight the importance of allowing girls to help shape sports programmes more effectively to their needs, and to express their motivations and ideas, thus improving participation. This is most often achieved by establishing a way to capture the girls’ voices and working with the girls directly.

Additionally, Women in Sport discovered that the positive impact of taking this innovative approach reaches far beyond the PE department. This includes increased concentration and improved behaviour, as well as important transferable skills useful for better negotiating day-to-day living, such as personal growth and increased self-esteem.

Through the two year pilot programme, the charity established a network of 25 schools and worked to help them adapt existing provision to create environments where it is ‘normal’ and aspirational for girls to be active, improving their health and wellbeing.

Women in Sport supported schools, through the work of a Schools Relationship Manager that it provided, to connect with partners, facilities and services in their local communities and promote local sportswomen as role models.

The pilot also addressed deeply ingrained issues around body image and self-confidence which research by Women in Sport shows contributes to preventing girls from being more active.

PE departments in participating schools are now demonstrating more awareness of the challenges girls face in engaging in physical activity and with input from girls, are shaping new opportunities for positive participation.

Schools that took part clearly valued being involved in the project and reported signs of more positive attitudes towards physical activity: from reduced sitting out in PE lessons, to take-up of new activities, as well as increased numbers taking GCSEs in PE. Participation in sport outside of school increased, with girls being motivated to do exercise by themselves, for themselves.

Women in Sport has wasted no time in applying its recommendations and in partnership with the Youth Sport Trust, is now putting the findings from Changing the Game for Girls: In Action into practice through a nationwide programme, Girls Active, currently working in over 90 schools.

Schools have been identifying less active girls, as well as those who are more traditionally ‘sporty’, to become Girls Active leaders, giving them the opportunity to take on leadership responsibilities and make PE and sport relevant to the lives of all girls in their school. This student led approach to sport and PE also gives opportunities to those girls who crave leadership responsibilities.

Ruth Holdaway, Chief Executive of Women in Sport said.

“At Women in Sport, we believe that getting girls active at an early age, ensuring they have a positive, empowering relationship with sport, is the key to them continuing to play sport and stay healthy through their adult lives.”

“Our report demonstrates the potential of sport and physical activity to impact on girls’ wellbeing, leadership and achievement across all aspects of their lives. There is an urgent need to articulate these messages strongly to senior leaders, teachers and girls themselves to raise the profile of PE and sport for girls in school.”

“This, we believe, is an effective and long-term way to tackle the entrenched gender gap in sports participation – and a key method to truly transform sport for the benefit of every woman and girl in the UK.”

Women in Sport calls on schools to implement measures to understand the needs of girls in sport and PE, shaping their activities with the involvement of the girls themselves.

May 2016 - What Influences Women to Take Part in Challenge Bike Rides?

women in cycling

Women in Sport has released a new report containing a case study of their insight work with British Cycling. The report investigates the barriers and motivators to women entering more formal ‘challenge’ rides and explores the potential methods of persuading women to try them. The aim was to find out how women who cycle recreationally transition to taking part in challenge rides.

The key values held by women who participate in cycling challenges are having fun, feeling good, achieving goals and nurturing friends and families. The three main barriers to participating in challenge rides are fear of not fitting in, fear of what might happen on the day and a lack of confidence.

Read more

April 2016 - MIND Helping Women Into Sport

get set

Mental health charity MIND is helping women with mental health problems find their sport and get active. Whether you don’t know where to start, or lack confidence, get searching and get in your lane. Check out its Get Set To Go project

April 2016 - Project 500: More Women, Better Coaching

Only 30% of coaches are female but we can change that!

Thanks to funding from Sport England, the Seven County Sports Partnerships in the South East have commissioned a recruitment video entitled ‘More Women, Better Coaching’.

Based on the premise that many women are already ‘coaching’ in their everyday lives, we would like to encourage them to use their skills in sport and physical activity. Whether a parent, grandparent, nurse, office manager, teacher or even student mentor women help others to learn new skills, develop and grow as people. These are all skills that coaches, activators and leaders need to make sport a worthwhile and meaningful experience for their participants.

By recognising the connection between the existing skills women already have and how they can be transferred to sports coaching we will increase the diversity of the coaching workforce and offer more choice to our participants.

Project 500 is a regional initiative across the South East of England, developed and delivered by seven county sports partnerships. The project has been active since 2013 and aims to recruit, develop and retain more women in coaching.

Join them on Twitter @femalecoaches and share their video

April 2016 - This Girl Can Project

This Girl Can is Sport England's nationwide campaign to get women and girls moving, regardless of shape, size and ability

Its research reveals a huge difference in the number of men and women playing sport. And it's not because females don't want to get active. Millions of women and girls are afraid to exercise because of fear of judgement.

The insight pack, Go Where Women Are, includes up-to-date research exploring the relevant motivations, barriers and triggers to getting more women more active.

The campaign is the first of its kind to feature women who sweat and jiggle as they exercise. It seeks to tell the real story of women who play sport by using images that are the complete opposite of the idealised and stylised images of women people are now used to seeing.

The campaign has clearly captured a nerve: 13 million people have now viewed the flagship This Girl Can film online.

The campaign doesn’t hold back in trying to encourage women to beat their barriers. "Sweating like a pig, feeling like a fox" and "I kick balls, deal with it" are among the hard-hitting lines used in the campaign to prompt a change in attitudes and help boost women’s confidence.

It comes as research reveals that at by every measure, fewer women than men play sport regularly – two million fewer 14-40 year olds in total. Despite this, 75 per cent say they want to be more active. In some other European countries, this disparity doesn’t exist.

Further research into what's stopping women turning their ambitions into reality found that a fear of judgement – on appearance, ability or how they chose to spend time on themselves – puts women of all ages off exercising.

The findings were the driving force behind the campaign’s creation, which aims to empower women and encourage more to get active.

Overcoming fear of judgement

Sport England CEO Jennie Price, said: “The figures on participation are crystal clear. There is a significant gender gap, with two million more men than women exercising or playing sport regularly. I believe we can tackle this gap, because our research shows that 75% of women would like to do more.

“Before we began this campaign, we looked very carefully at what women were saying about why they felt sport and exercise was not for them. Some of the issues, like time and cost, were familiar, but one of the strongest themes was a fear of judgement. Worries about being judged for being the wrong size, not fit enough and not skilled enough came up time and again.

"Every single woman I have talked to about this campaign – and that is now hundreds – has identified with this, and it is that fear of not being ‘good enough’ in some way, and the fear that you are the only one who feels like that, that we want to address.

“In This Girl Can we want to tell the real story of women who exercise and play sport. They come in all shapes and sizes and all levels of ability. They have a myriad of reasons for doing what they do. If you are wondering if you should join them – or carry on – this campaign says it really doesn’t matter if you are a bit rubbish or completely brilliant, the main thing is that you are a woman and you are doing something, and that deserves to be celebrated.”

For more about This Girl Can, go to the This Girl Can website where you can find out about the women in the campaign, get tips on how to get active and join the national debate. You can also use the hashtag #thisgirlcan to join the conversation on Twitter.

April 2016 - Like a Girl

See how sport can change the meaning of “like a girl” from an insult to the ultimate compliment!

April 2016 - Changing the Game for Girls

girls in sport

Women in Sport releases the findings of a two-year project aimed at improving the provision of PE for girls in schools. Changing the Game for Girls: In Action makes tried and tested recommendations that are now being applied in schools across the country, to provide a solution to the alarmingly low levels of girls’ playing sport.

Only 7% of girls currently meet the government recommendations for physical activity and a third of girls age 12-15 in England are classified as overweight or obese. Now, within weeks of plans being announced to fund more sport in schools through a tax on sugary drinks, Changing the Game for Girls: In Action shares tested strategies on how best to address these shocking figures.

Funded by the Department of Health, the new research aims to inspire girls to take part in and enjoy sport at school, developing a positive relationship with sport from a young age as a long term, effective way to stay healthy throughout their adult lives.

Nearly 2 million fewer women than men take part in sport at least once per week and, finding from their study in 2012 that this gender gap between girls and boys playing sport begins to open at around age 8 – much earlier than previously thought – Women in Sport developed and piloted new approaches and interventions for girls at 25 schools across England.

The findings in our report highlight the importance of allowing girls to help shape sports programmes more effectively to their needs, and to express their motivations and ideas, thus improving participation. This is most often achieved by establishing a way to capture the girls’ voices and working with the girls directly.

Additionally, Women in Sport discovered that the positive impact of taking this innovative approach reaches far beyond the PE department. This includes increased concentration and improved behaviour, as well as important transferable skills useful for better negotiating day-to-day living, such as personal growth and increased self-esteem.

Through the two year pilot programme, the charity established a network of 25 schools and worked to help them adapt existing provision to create environments where it is ‘normal’ and aspirational for girls to be active, improving their health and wellbeing.

Women in Sport supported schools, through the work of a Schools Relationship Manager that it provided, to connect with partners, facilities and services in their local communities and promote local sportswomen as role models.

The pilot also addressed deeply ingrained issues around body image and self-confidence which research by Women in Sport shows contributes to preventing girls from being more active.

PE departments in participating schools are now demonstrating more awareness of the challenges girls face in engaging in physical activity and with input from girls, are shaping new opportunities for positive participation.

Schools that took part clearly valued being involved in the project and reported signs of more positive attitudes towards physical activity: from reduced sitting out in PE lessons, to take-up of new activities, as well as increased numbers taking GCSEs in PE. Participation in sport outside of school increased, with girls being motivated to do exercise by themselves, for themselves.

Women in Sport has wasted no time in applying its recommendations and in partnership with the Youth Sport Trust, is now putting the findings from Changing the Game for Girls: In Action into practice through a nationwide programme, Girls Active, currently working in over 90 schools.

Schools have been identifying less active girls, as well as those who are more traditionally ‘sporty’, to become Girls Active leaders, giving them the opportunity to take on leadership responsibilities and make PE and sport relevant to the lives of all girls in their school. This student led approach to sport and PE also gives opportunities to those girls who crave leadership responsibilities.

Ruth Holdaway, Chief Executive of Women in Sport said.

“At Women in Sport, we believe that getting girls active at an early age, ensuring they have a positive, empowering relationship with sport, is the key to them continuing to play sport and stay healthy through their adult lives.”

“Our report demonstrates the potential of sport and physical activity to impact on girls’ wellbeing, leadership and achievement across all aspects of their lives. There is an urgent need to articulate these messages strongly to senior leaders, teachers and girls themselves to raise the profile of PE and sport for girls in school.”

“This, we believe, is an effective and long-term way to tackle the entrenched gender gap in sports participation – and a key method to truly transform sport for the benefit of every woman and girl in the UK.”

Women in Sport calls on schools to implement measures to understand the needs of girls in sport and PE, shaping their activities with the involvement of the girls themselves.

From 'Women in Sport' website

October 2016 - Engaging Young Girls in Team Sports

girls in team sports

The Youth Sport Trust has announced a new partnership with the England and Wales Cricket Board, England Hockey and England Netball to launch TeamUp – a new campaign to encourage young girls to engage with team sport.

TeamUp aims to capitalise on the momentum gained by three home World Cups to build a fan base for women’s team sport to encourage girls age 7-13 years to take part in sport. The campaign aims to:

  • ensure 150,000 girls aged 7-13 have more access to team sport
  • get over 5,000 participating school each year
  • get schools to increase their offer of cricket, hockey and netball with at least 60% providing opportunities for all three sports.

In addition training resources and toolkits have been developed for teachers and participating schools will be in with a chance of winning rewards.

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